Multigrain Porridge

March 6, 2022

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Comforting Multigrain Porridge – such a delicious breakfast made with three types of nutritious whole grains. It’s very hearty and filling, it has a soft yet chewy texture, and whole grain nutty flavor.

Multigrain porridge made with steel cut oats, farro and amaranth. It is shown served with fresh blueberries, sliced almond and maple syrup.

What is Porridge?

Porridge is a soft food with a creamy or mushy consistency that’s typically served warm. It is made by boiling together any chopped or crushed grain or starchy plants with a liquid such as milk or water.

The most common versions (at least here in the U.S) are served for breakfast but different variations are served for other meals.

Porridge is ancient dish that has been around for thousands of years and has been a cheap and comforting dish that has fed many civilizations.

There are many variations, a few of the most well known types are made using rice, cornmeal, oats, and wheat.

I have tried several different grain blends for porridge and this was my favorite blend including the steel cut oats, farro and amaranth.

I think you’ll love this version of porridge too! It’s something the whole family can enjoy (even my kids love it!).

Other names porridge are commonly given include:

  • mush
  • hot cereal
  • oatmeal
  • grits or polenta

Ingredients needed to make multigrain porridge.

Multigrain Porridge Recipe Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup EACH steel cut oats, farro, and amaranth
  • 4 cups water
  • 1/4 tsp (heaping) salt
  • 1/2 cup milk, plus more to thin (can use non-dairy milk)
  • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 – 2 Tbsp real maple syrup, or more to taste

Possible Substitutes

Other grains you can try to using as substitutes for farro are:

  • Bulgur
  • Spelt berries
  • Barley
  • Brown rice
  • Freekeh

Just note that cook times will may vary slightly (brown rice and barley take longer to cook, and you may need more liquid).

Decent substitutes for the amaranth are:

  • Millet
  • Quinoa

Where to Purchase Farro and Amaranth

  • Farro is becoming more readily available at larger grocery chains (I buy it at Kroger and Associated Foods), you can also buy it online.
  • Amaranth is a littler harder to find. I buy it online and a Whole Foods. A big note here is that some versions can have grit (debris or sand of some sort) and this texture can ruin a dish. With the brand I’ve shared in the link above I haven’t noticed this problem (rinsing may help with others).

Four photos together showing steps of making porridge on the stovetop.

How to Make Porridge

  1. Mix grains and water in pan: Add steel cut oats, farro, amaranth, water and salt to a large saucepan and stir.
  2. Simmer: Bring mixture to a simmer over medium-high heat. Then reduce heat to low and simmer uncovered until nearly tender, stirring occasionally, about 25 minutes.
  3. Add milk when almost done: Add milk and cinnamon and cook, stirring frequently, until tender, about 5 minutes longer while thinning with more milk as desired.
  4. Sweeten: Stir in maple syrup, add desired toppings. Serve warm.

Helpful Tips

  • Milk forms a skin while simmering in porridge, plus it boils over easier so I like to wait until near the end to add it.
  • Stir more frequently near the end to prevent sticking and burning on bottom.
  • If you don’t have a sieve fine enough rinsing isn’t absolutely necessary for the amaranth.
  • This multigrain porridge will thicken as it rests, thin with more water or milk as desired.

Storage

  • Leftovers of this porridge should be stored in the fridge.
  • It will keep well there in an airtight container for 3 days.
  • Reheat in the microwave and thin with water or milk as desired.

Porridge shown in a white bowl over a wooden plate with dried grains to the side. It is shown served with orange juice.

Good Toppings for Porridge

The options for toppings are endless but here are few good ideas:

  • chopped nuts
  • dried fruit like raisins or dried cranberries
  • fresh fruit such as berries, bananas, peaches, mangos, and apples
  • shredded coconut
  • nut butters
  • fruit curds, jams or syrups
  • hemp seeds
  • yogurt

Difference Between Oatmeal and Porridge

Is oatmeal porridge? Yes oatmeal is considered porridge, but oatmeal is just one specific type of porridge, and porridge is a more all-encompassing term and can be made with many different types of grains.

More Delicious Breakfast Recipes to Try

Multigrain porridge
5 from 1 vote

Multigrain Porridge

Such a comforting and delicious breakfast made with three types of nutritious whole grains. It's a very hearty and filling, it has a soft yet chewy texture, and whole grain nutty flavor.
Servings: 4
Prep5 minutes
Cook30 minutes
Ready in: 35 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup steel cut oats (not quick cooking)
  • 1/2 cup farro, rinsed in a fine sieve and drained
  • 1/2 cup amaranth, rinsed in a fine sieve and drained*
  • 4 cups water
  • 1/4 tsp (heaping) salt
  • 1/2 cup milk, plus more to thin
  • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 - 2 Tbsp real maple syrup, or more to taste

Instructions

  • Add steel cut oats, farro, amaranth, water and salt to a large saucepan and stir.
  • Bring mixture to a simmer over medium-high heat. Then reduce heat to low and simmer uncovered until nearly tender, stirring occasionally, about 25 minutes.
  • Add milk and cinnamon and cook, stirring frequently, until tender, about 5 minutes longer while thinning with more milk as desired.
  • Stir in maple syrup, add desired toppings. Serve warm.

Notes

  • If you don't have a sieve fine enough to rinse the amaranth you can skip this step. I buy amaranth here.
  • Good toppings include chopped nuts, dried fruit like raisins or dried cranberries, fresh berries, bananas, peaches, mangos, apples, coconut, nut butters, fruit curds, jams or syrups.
Nutrition Facts
Multigrain Porridge
Amount Per Serving
Calories 263 Calories from Fat 36
% Daily Value*
Fat 4g6%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Trans Fat 1g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 1g
Cholesterol 2mg1%
Sodium 148mg6%
Potassium 236mg7%
Carbohydrates 50g17%
Fiber 8g33%
Sugar 2g2%
Protein 10g20%
Vitamin A 37IU1%
Vitamin C 1mg1%
Calcium 101mg10%
Iron 3mg17%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Nutrition values are estimates only. See full disclaimer here.